Child Care, Food Assistance, Internet & Youth Supports

Child Care

from The Child Center’s shared google doc and 4J’s Coronavirus Resource Page

Employment-Related Day Care program (ERDC): The Employment-Related Day Care program (ERDC) helps eligible low-income families pay for childcare while they are working. ERDC is a subsidy program, meaning eligible families still pay part of the childcare cost. The income threshold for this assistance has been raised significantly, so many families are now eligible who previously were not. Families may now apply or re-apply over the phone.¬†If families are unable to apply online or with a paper application and they have an application on file within the last 18 months, DHS staff can conduct an intake via phone with a verbal signature obtained on the call. Temp rate/eligibility changes: There is no copay ‚Äď copays have been reduced to $0.00.¬† The income limit has increased for initial eligibility, increasing the income limit from 185 percent of the federal poverty level ($4,040 per month for a family of four) to 250 percent of the federal poverty level or 85 percent of the state median income, whichever is higher for the family size

Essential workers expanded child care subsidies. You can apply for your essential worker subsidy at https://apps.state.or.us/onlineApplication/ While this application appears to only be for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) it will cover ERDC and when the eligibility worker calls to verify the application the worker needs to note they are interested in ERDC.  There is also a process to get your current child care provider qualified (and paid by the State).

  1. Call 211 and follow the prompt for Child Care
  2. Text the keyword ‚Äúchildren‚ÄĚ or ‚Äúni√Īos‚ÄĚ‚ÄĮto 898211 (TXT211)
  3. Email‚ÄĮchildren@211info.org

Additional organizations providing childcare for essential workers:

Food Assistance

from 4J Nutrition Services

Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT)

The Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) and Department of Education have announced that families with children who qualify for free or reduced-price school meals or attend a school/program that provides free meals for all students will get cash benefits for the meals they would have received at school.

The so-called Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) of $5.70 per school day during the closure is intended to offset the cost of meals for students, even if they have been accessing meals from schools during the closure.

If you were receiving meal benefits prior to the pandemic or your student attends a school/program where meals are free for all students, look for a message from DHS to activate benefits.

If you are eligible for free and reduced-price meals, but have not yet applied for benefits, you can apply online. You may also request a paper application to be mailed to your home by emailing nutrition@4j.lane.edu. Your P-EBT benefits will start at the beginning of the month you qualify.

Please note that the 4J is not involved in fund disbursement. If you have questions, call the state helpline at 2-1-1 or the local DHS office at (541) 686-7878.

Free grab-and-go meals

Available for all 4J students and youth 18 years old and younger through December 2020. There are no income requirements and no application necessary. Children do not need to be present when picking up meals. Families can choose the location that is most convenient for them, regardless of where they live or attend school. Please follow the directions posted at each site. Families are required to use social distancing strategies (6 feet distance from anyone not in your household) when accessing meal sites. All meals are intended to be picked up and not consumed onsite.

Meal Sites

Opens September 14: Monday‚ÄďFriday 10:45 a.m.‚Äď2:00 p.m. (subject to change based on participation)

Churchill Region

  • Arts & Technology Academy, 1650 W. 22nd Ave.
  • McCornack Elementary, 1968 Brittany St.

North Eugene Region

  • Howard Elementary School, 700 Howard Ave.
  • River Road/El Camino del R√≠o Elementary School, 120 West Hilliard Lane
  • Madison Middle School, 875 Wilkes Drive

Sheldon Region

  • Cal Young Middle School, 2555 Gilham Road
  • Holt Elementary School, 770 Calvin St.

South Eugene Region

  • Roosevelt Middle School, 500 East 24th Avenue
  • Spencer Butte Middle School, 500 East 43rd Avenue

Downtown

  • ECCO, 200 N. Monroe St. (behind the district office)

FOOD For Lane County (FFLC), the area’s nonprofit food bank, continues to distribute food to its network of more than 150 churches and social service agencies during the coronavirus outbreak. The agency is providing an up-to-date list of closures and schedule changes for local food pantries. Community food resources for families in need include:

Internet

from 4J’s Coronavirus Resource Page

Eugene School District 4J is joining with Comcast to provide economically disadvantaged students free internet for the entire school year to support online learning. With comprehensive distance learning beginning Sept. 14, the district is committed to ensuring all students are connected to high-speed internet access so they can be successful academically and remain connected with their teachers and peers while learning online.

Comcast is offering two free months of high-speed internet access to qualifying low-income families through its Internet Essentials program. Eugene School District 4J will pay the monthly service charges for the rest of the school year for a limited number of eligible students to continue to access online learning. The district has funds to initially support 166 eligible students, but could expand the program, depending on the level of demand.

Students may be eligible if they qualify for free or reduced-price school meals or are eligible for other public assistance programs such as housing assistance, Medicaid, SNAP (food stamps) and SSI, among others.

To qualify, student must also live in an area served by Comcast and must not have had Comcast internet in the last 90 days; households who owe money to Comcast may still qualify if approved by Dec. 31. There is no term contract, no credit check and no installation fee.

Parents or students who need internet access and think they qualify should complete the request form (available here) or call 541-790-7757 (English) or 541-790-7758 (Spanish). The district will contact eligible students and provide them with a unique code to use when applying for the service through Comcast.

Youth

from White Bird Clinic’s Community Resources Page

  • 15th Night: Will be continuing to offer support and resources for unhoused youth and those working with them via phone and text at (541) 246-4046.
  • First Place Family Center: First Place Family Center is open under normal operating hours: 8-5PM, 7 days a week with strict social distancing guidelines.¬†Housed families will be able to pick up mail, hygiene products, diapers, and other critical items.¬†Literally homeless families (in shelter, cars, or on streets), are able to use showers, laundry, preschool (starting 6/24, with enrollment restrictions), and meals. Children will need to be present for families to use the center. Only 4-5 families will be allowed a time, depending on the services being used.¬†FPFC Night Shelter program has openings for families needing emergency shelter. To enroll, families must visit FPFC first.¬†For more information, contact (541) 342-7728 or visit https://www.svdp.us/what-we-do/homeless-services/first-place-family-center/
  • Head Start: Head Start starts with at home learning for September.¬† Returning families will need to complete an orientation before at home learning starts. Visit www.hsolc.org and click on the ‘Enroll’ tab to enroll.
  • Hosea Youth Services:¬†The Resource Service Center will be open from 1 to 6:30 pm for essential needs only (showers, laundry, etc). Dinner will be to-go boxes, and will be served at 5pm
  • LaneKids website: Resources for families including information about food sites, educational and recreational activities being offered in different formats, physical and mental health resources, and other community services available.
  • Looking Glass: Station 7 and New Roads have not yet altered either of our hours or services. Station 7 remains open 24/7 with shelter and basic needs services and New Roads is open Monday-Friday 8:30 am to 4:45 pm with showers, laundry, meals, hygiene, phone and computer access and case management.
  • New Roads: Open 8:30 am to 4:45 pm Monday through Friday but we will be handing out to go meals and to go hygiene items through our door; only allowing one youth in at a time for shower and laundry access. Youth can either just show up and knock on our window or call ahead to schedule a time for shower/laundry.
  • Parenting through COVID19: Resources available at https://parentingnow.org/parents/parenting-through-covid-19/
  • Station 7 – Looking Glass: Services remain unchanged aside from requiring youth to have their temperature taken at access and thoroughly wash their hands. Youth who show up with symptoms of Covid-19 need to be assessed by a medical professional prior to being allowed shelter access. Capacity is 8 youth per night. Asking that youth accessing shelter remain in the program for 24 hours a day.
  • The Child Center: Programs are open, working to faciliate telehealth appointments for therapeutic services as much as possible.
  • White Bird¬†HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools): Offering mental health support by phone for students, families, and staff of high schools in the 4J, Springfield, Bethel, Oakridge and South Lane school districts. The phone line is staffed by crisis counselors who normally work the HOOTS school clinics, or work on CAHOOTS. The phone line is accessible from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Monday through Friday. Video support is available from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM on weekdays and is accessed by emailing¬†hoots@whitebirdclinic.org¬†with your name and preferred time. We are able to provide short term counseling and mental health support, resource referrals and OHP sign up.
    • For students, families and staff of 4J, Eugene Charter and Bethel High Schools please call (541) 246-2342.
    • For students, families and staff of Springfield, Oakridge and South Lane High Schools please call (541) 246-2332.
  • Women Infant Children (WIC): Still accepting new enrollments.¬† Appointments are conducted over the phone. Call (541) 682-4202.
  • Youth ERA: ‚ÄúVirtual Drops‚ÄĚ every weekday from 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM on Discord. One-on-ones via phone/text, through video chat, and over their various YE-issued social media accounts including Instagram, TikTok, and Facebook. Peer Support on Twitch, Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response https://www.youthera.org/

Volunteer Interest Forms

Some schools use them. Some don’t. What do you think about them?¬†Here are two templates we’ve collected.

Volunteer Pledge Form

Some schools are also using Project Appleseed’s¬†Parental Involvement Pledge¬†and¬†Toolbox¬†to increase family engagement and volunteerism.

Questions for your Parent Group to Think About

  • How do we make volunteer or community outreach opportunities available for students? For their extended family members?¬†For neighbors?
  • How do we respect¬†the many differences in our school community and ensure¬†a diverse array of volunteer opportunities that allow for maximum parental participation?
  • Do we give our volunteers name tags? How do we help them to get to know one another?

School Transitions

Helpful literature and videos for parents and students on the transition into Kindergarten, Middle School, and High School from the Georgia Department of Education:

Kindergarten Transition Toolkit
Thumbnail image of Kindergarten Transition Handout

Kindergarten Transition
Handout (English)

Kindergarten Transition
Handout (Spanish)

Thumbnail image of Kindergarten Transition Manual for Educators

Kindergarten Transition
Manual for Educators

Thumbnail image of Kindergarten Transition Video in English

Kindergarten Transition
Video (English) on YouTube

Thumbnail image of Kindergarten Transition Video (Spanish)

Kindergarten Transition
Video (Spanish) on YouTube

 Video: Middle School Matters Рfull video with all segments

Middle School Transition Toolkit
Thumbnail image of Middle School Matters Transition Handout for Famiies

Middle School Matters Handout
for Families (English)

Middle School Matters Handout
for Families (Spanish)

Thumbnail image of Middle School Matters Transition Handout for Students

Middle School Matters Handout
for Students (English)

Middle School Matters Handout
for Students (Spanish)

Thumbnail image of Middle School Matters video in English

Middle School Matters
full video on YouTube
(English) 15:42 

Thumbnail image of Middle School Matters video in Spanish

Middle School Matters
full video on YouTube
(Spanish) 15:42 

 Video: Middle School РSocial and Emotional Changes
Thumbnail image of Middle School Social and Emotional Changes video in English

Middle School
Social and Emotional Changes
video on YouTube (English) 3:42

Thumbnail image of Middle School Social and Emotional Changes video in Spanish

Middle School
Social and Emotional Changes
video on YouTube (Spanish) 3:42

 Video: Middle School РOrganizational and Environmental Factors
Thumbnail image of Middle School Organizational and Environmental Factors video in English

Middle School
Organizational and
Environmental Factors
video on YouTube (English) 2:17

Thumbnail image of Middle School Organizational and Environmental Factors video in Spanish

Middle School
Organizational and
Environmental Factors
video on YouTube (Spanish) 2:17

 Video: Middle School РAcademics
Thumbnail image of Middle School Academics video in English

Middle School Academics
video on YouTube (English) 1:48

Thumbnail image of Middle School Academics video in Spanish

Middle School Academics
video on YouTube (Spanish) 1:48

 Video: Middle School РDevelopmental Growth
Thumbnail image of Middle School Developmental Growth video in English

Middle School
Developmental Growth
video on YouTube (English) 2:10

Thumbnail image of Middle School Developmental Growth video in Spanish

Middle School
Developmental Growth
video on YouTube (Spanish) 2:10

 Video: Middle School РCollege and Career Readiness
Thumbnail image of Middle School College and Career Readiness video in English

Middle School
College and Career Readiness
video on YouTube (English) 2:04

Thumbnail image of Middle School College and Career Readiness video in Spanish

Middle School
College and Career Readiness
video on YouTube (Spanish) 2:04

¬†Video: Middle School – Becoming Involved In My Child’s Education
Thumbnail image of Middle School Becoming Involved in My Child's Education video in English

Middle School
Becoming Involved In
My Child’s Education
video on YouTube (English) 2:12

Thumbnail image of Kindergarten Transition Video in Spanish

Middle School
Becoming Involved In
My Child’s Education
video on YouTube (Spanish) 2:12

High School Transition Toolkit
Thumbnail image of High School is Happening Transition Handout for Famiies

High School is Happening Handout
for Families (English)

High School is Happening Handout
for Families (Spanish
)

Thumbnail image of High School is Happening Transition Handout for Students

High School is Happening Handout
for Students (English)

High School is Happening Handout
for Students (Spanish
)

Thumbnail image of High School is Happening Introduction video

Video: High School is
Happening Introduction
(YouTube) 1:39

Thumbnail image of High School - Discovering Your Self video

Video: High School
Discovering Your Self
(YouTube) 5:33

Thumbnail image of High School - Before the Report Card Arrives video

Video: High School
Before the Report card Arrives‚Äč
(YouTube) 5:53

 

Thumbnail image of High School - Learning How to Balance video

Video: High School
Learning How to Balance‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč
(YouTube) 6:04

Thumbnail image of High School - The Graduation Plan video

Video: High School
The Graduation Plan‚Äč
(YouTube) 5:21

Thumbnail image of High School - The Graduation Plan video

Video: High School
Parent Talkback‚Äč‚Äč
(YouTube) 3:34

‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč‚Äč

Community & Neighborhood Matching Grants Program

Document[2]The Neighborhood Matching Grants (NMG) program can help in building community, creating connections and improving our neighborhoods, parks and natural areas. Applications for smaller projects, less than $5,000 will be considered by City staff for approval and funding on an ongoing basis.

Proposals will only be accepted from groups of people living, working, or owning property within the neighborhood boundary in which the project is located. A neighborhood group may be an existing group whose membership is from a commonly recognized geographic area (e.g., neighborhood association, business association, or school PTO or site council) or an ad hoc group formed to work together on a specific project.

What types of projects are considered?

Projects may include, but are not limited to; public school partnership projects that benefit school children and the immediate neighborhood; those that build a safer and more welcoming community for marginalized or vulnerable community
members; physical improvement projects that involve recreation or public safety facilities, natural resource features, public art and spaces, or community gardens, and projects that improve universal accessibility; and Outreach, research, education or organizing projects that address planning-related topics such as transportation (pedestrian or cyclist safety), land use neighborhood or area planning) or public safety (disaster planning, neighborhood mapping, neighborhood safety).

If your project involves property that your organization or applicant group does not own you will need to get written approval from the owner. For private property, the owner of the parcel must approve the project. For projects on school grounds documentation is required from the District and school principal.

  • 4J School District contacts:¬†Kerry Delf, Communications and Intergovernmental Relations, at 541-687-3245 (delf_k@4j.lane.edu) or Harlan Coats, Facilities Management, 541-790-7409 (coats@4j.lane.edu).

See the Guidelines for Smaller Project>>
See the FY18 Application for Smaller Projects>>

If you need more information or have questions please contact Cindy Koehler at 541-682-5272.

TAG Focused Summer Fun and More!

by Heather Kliever, 4J TAG Families Email List

Summer will soon be upon us- difficult to believe with the current deluge of rain…

The following is the top summer options I have found, and in some cases used, for my son. All of the camps I list offer financial aid and have proven track records of promoting a positive community experience. Enjoy!

Oak Hill has a plethora of great programming this summer! Here is a link to the overview of all OH’s summer camp offerings:¬†http://oakhillschool.com/student-resources/summer-2017/#1489623724952-51d9deed-ac59

In particular, check out the residential Summer Enrichment Program grid of classes July 23-August 5  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wXh5f5ze5ulWXmrqVHUl8Aj1IpyCySuqrJcjhxsVB9M/edit?ts=585069cb I want to take some of these classes, too!

My son has taken classes through the Summer on the Hill program that I cannot recommend enough!  Excellent staff, super reasonable prices and fantastic variety of topics. Ade will take the Algebra II/PreCalc class even though he is an 8th grader. In the past, the instructors have been willing to take children who meet the pre-requisite requirements so, look at the grade information as a suggestion and be in pleasant communication with the summer coordinator and/or instructor early on. I have had wonder help from staff- they always reply, are excited to hear from you and offer suggestions! I may be gushing here but they are the tops absolutely in my books!
Here is a link to the schedule https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lwCVXrdiyT-2Jyvl03Pe7RcWYv1bqzo6kfe0iUXZyP8/edit

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Have you been keeping up with the recent articles on the importance of nature and movement for children?
If not, check out this New York Times article printed today on “Why Kids Shouldn’t Sit Still in Class” ¬†https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/21/well/family/why-kids-shouldnt-sit-still-in-class.html?emc=edit_tnt_20170321&nlid=65229791&tntemail0=y&_r=0
and this Ken Robinson video from TES discussing five reasons you should take your class outside https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/watch-sir-ken-robinson-shares-five-reasons-you-should-take-your-class. The video is less than three mins long.
OMSI has outdoor camps with residential options. Here is a link to web page that you can customize for your campers needs: https://www.omsi.edu/camps-classes-results. I have not used this camp but have been receiving updates about Camp Gray Coastal Discovery Center in Newport for the last couple years. If you have some experience, please share with the group!
Also, the City of Eugene has excellent outdoor recreation options. I would recommend looking at any offerings through the River House. The prices for the experience is excellent for what is offered. Safety equipment, great staff/student ratios and a schedule that is traditional 40 hr/week work friendly! Cant be beat!  https://www.eugene-or.gov/749/Outdoor

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Southern Oregon University has the oldest TAG summer camp in the state. My son has attended two out of the last three years and really, really enjoyed his time there. Brain Bowl, trips to Emigrant Lake and an evening show at the extraordinary Oregon Shakespeare Festival included! This is an incredible bargain for the experience. If Ade gets in this year I am more than willing to help carpool your camper down, too. The financial aid packages are generous- call early for details and to apply.    https://inside.sou.edu/youth/academy/index.html

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Finally, a camp that I adore but requires a lot of sacrifice with time and driving. The Saturday Academy program through the University of Portland has amazing programs during the academic year and day camps during the summer. We have been hitting the road at 6am the last four Saturdays to get Ade to an Epidemiology class- taught by Kristen Haberthur, a PhD in Viral Immunology and a wicked sense of humor and penchant for dystopian video games. It is very worth the time and effort. If you can get on their mailing list I would recommend looking through the offerings. If something catches your attention share with the group. Perhaps we could figure out a carpool! Generous financial aid available for families on free or reduced lunch. https://www.saturdayacademy.org/
Of particular note, I want to direct your attention to the TAG Challenge Camp offered through Saturday Academy and hosted at Reed College. I am calling to find out if there is a residential or host family option for those of us out of town. https://www.saturdayacademy.org/node/4812?utm_content=buffer0b6b5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer. Check out the Portland Public Schools TAG site http://www.pps.net/tag this links to the guiding documents that the school district follows in terms of TAG definitions. It. Is. AWESOME!
There are a lot more classes and camps available locally! Please let others know if you have a particular camp or offering that our kids would be interested in this summer.
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Finally, some more resources for you to read regarding TAG and the regular school classroom. Nothing is better than to be an informed parent when advocating for your child!
  • Teaching Young Gifted Children in the Regular Classroom: Identifying, Nurturing, and Challenging Ages 4-9 by Joan Franklin Smutny, Sally Yahnke and Elizabeth A Meckstroth
  • Teaching Gifted Kids in Today’s Classroom: Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use, 3rd Ed., Susan Winebrenner and Dina Brulles
  • Gifted and Talented Children in the Regular Classroom, E Paul Torrence and Dorothy A. Sisk